Czech food bland?

Discussion in 'Food & Drink' started by shreypete, Jul 13, 2007.

  1. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

    As far as sweet dishes for lunch are concerned, the lunch itself starts with a hearty soup - goulash, bean, lentil, tripe etc., quite often with some bread; followed by fruit dumplings, sweet rice pudding with fruit, pancakes with jelly, farmer´s cheese and whipped cream, crepes etc. Just imagine the soup is the main dish, and the sweet stuff is a dessert :) .
     
  2. shreypete

    shreypete Well-Known Member

    but i'm sure that after the sweet rice pudding or pancakes with jelly (assuming its main-course acc. to Czech standards), then they (czechs) probably also eat a dessert, maybe a strudel with ice-cream or something like that.....so technically that's a double dessert :? ?
     
  3. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

    No way - you will have to see the serving size of the sweet dish... :lol:
     
  4. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

    BTW - it would be a sin to spoil Czech strudel (namely mine) with ice-cream!!!
     
  5. shreypete

    shreypete Well-Known Member

    oh...my fault...i didnt mean strudel with ice cream...i meant pancakes with ice cream or something....it would actually spoil the strudel if otherwise..... :eek:
     
  6. stepan

    stepan Well-Known Member

    I do not believe Czechs make pancakes - they do make "palacinky" - bettern known in the Western world as crepes. As to ice cream and palacinky - I never have had it at home. However, a number of years ago, crepe restaurants were very popular and they use to make crepes (not palacinky) with all kinds of filling from vegetables to meat to ice cream, none really to my liking.

    I am a traditionalist when it comes to palacinky - I like the jam filling or my mother use to make a cheese filling with raisins that I simply LOVED. Does anyone out there have a recipe for that?
     
  7. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

    Czechs do make pancakes - lívance (using either yeast or buttermilk batter); actually, I found a recipe for Czech pancakes in the Illustrated Encyclopedia of American Cooking, but they were called Norwegian pancakes there.
    As far as the cheese filling for crepes is concerned, it needs moist farmer´s cheese, egg yolk, vanilla, sugar and raisins (I personally add a spoonful of instant vanilla pudding - it improves the taste, color and consistence), everything whisked together. Some rum can be used as a bath for raisins before using them - yummy!
     
  8. stepan

    stepan Well-Known Member

    Jana,

    In my home, we never had the pancakes, so I guess I did not know.

    As to the recipe - yes that sounds familar. And yes - soak the raisins in rum - makes for better tasting palacinky.
     
  9. shreypete

    shreypete Well-Known Member

    and Jana or Stepan...do they have the ready to eat czech dishes in the supermarkets and stuff? becuase i wont have that much time to cook in general and i do have financial concerns if eating lunch and dinner outside everyday (that too in Prague)....so i was thinking that i'd compensate by buying some breakfast items (Cheese, marmelade, and stuff) and then i would eat lunch out and then breakfast again in my dorm (which i would cook...hopefully something that doesnt take too much time...which is why i was wondering about the ready-to-eat dishes).....
     
  10. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

    Well, I suppose you will be able to get your lunch in one of students´ cafeterias (menza) for a very affordable price; but you can buy ready-to-eat dishes (fresh or frozen) in supermarkets, even in some groceries and butcher´s shops. The choice usualy covers Czech food (goulash, roast pork, beef stew, grilled chicken) and Italian too (lasagne, tortellini, pizza and such).
    Some menza facilities offer dinner too, but I do not know much about the present situation in Prague. Hopefully, somebody else here will answer your questions better than I.
     
  11. shreypete

    shreypete Well-Known Member

    oh thanks...i got enough info...atleast with the czech ready-to-eat dishes.....and italian for a bonus....awesome! :D
     
  12. Sova

    Sova Well-Known Member

    As I recall, the ready-to-eat meals cost substantially more than in the U.S., that is, speaking relatively based on the costs of the ingredients to make the meal in the respective countries. Probably this is due to the fact that Czechs don't buy that sort of pre-prepared meals as often as Americans. Of course, that was over 10 years ago, though, so this may have changed. Just a head's up.
     
  13. shreypete

    shreypete Well-Known Member

    thanks for letting me know...i'll keep a heads-up on that.... :)
     

Share This Page