Your reasons for learning Czech

Discussion in 'General Language' started by uuspoiss, Dec 23, 2004.

  1. sherman

    sherman Member

    My grandmother remembers only being able to speak Czech when she was a little girl, but can't remember any now, except for simple phrases. She said my grandfather wanted their kids to learn it, but at the time it was frowned upon and the only way to succeed was to speak English and after WWII it was especially frowned upon in the US. There are small towns in Texas that still only speak Czech. I guess living in Hawaii where everyone is so in touch with their heritage made me think, "I know I'm part Czech, but I don't really know much about it." I just wanted to learn more about my heritage than just kolaces (sorry, English spelling) and Plzner! Now, I'm hoping to visit sometime and just have a love for learning new languages even if I'm not that good at it!
     
  2. Lazurus

    Lazurus New Member

    I just got back from skiing in the eagle mountains today, it was absolutely fantastic and prague itself is such an awesome city. the main reason i wanted to lean is because whilst i was out there i met an amazing girl, we got on so well, despite not being able to really talk properly to one another. i would love to learn the language so that we are able to express ourselves verbally, not just physically.
     
  3. gypzy

    gypzy Well-Known Member

    Hi!

    I have a few reasons to learn Czech. I have ancestory from Nosalov, Bohemia. Now that I know as far as I can in the states for ancestory, I would like to get more info for Bohemian ancestory. I would like to go there someday. I have a suspicion that I need to learn German also, for some history records. When I do go I want to be able to talk to people w/out having to fumble through the translation dictionary.

    The Czech Republic has a beautiful culture, scenery, history, etc. Many websites are either strictly written in Czech or if they have English sites they don't seem to have as much info. Take in case the site for the National Museum. Many websites that give info on Nosalov aren't in English.

    I'm in the tourism industry and I have heard that tourism in the Czech Republic is growing. I would like to learn the language in case there is ever a boom in need of bi-lingual people for hotels, museums or things that interest English speaking tourists.

    I have just recently started to visit the local lingo site. It really seems to help this "cheap skate". I like being able to read along with having the real audio. I can click on to hear all the words on a page or click an individual word if I didn't get it the first time. I do have a small pocket size translation dictionary and phrasebook. I believe it is easier to HEAR then to just READ pronunciation.

    By 4 Now
     
  4. chewjoel

    chewjoel Member

    Well, I learn (eh... OK, just started with the basics some times ago, to be exact.) because I'm having a traineeship here in Brno and most people I came across here can't really speak English. (Not to mention Malay or Chinese though I know there're some Chinese here but hmm... I can't differenciate between Chinese and Vietnamese yet. :wink: ) I hope I can at least have simple conversation with people here, so...
    This language is pretty hard for me though, not like any other languages I know. :D
     
  5. Beretta03

    Beretta03 Active Member

    I am learning Czech because I hope to continue missionary work in the Czech. I was in the Czech last year and visited Praha, Liberec and many others and was very impressed. In the camp we taught American English. Since I expected the students to learn English I decided to learn Czech.

    Brad Racine,WI,USA
     
  6. rachelhoff

    rachelhoff New Member

    I met some friends who live in Kladno, on a website. A couple of them speak good English, one not so good, and they all have been happy to teach me some Czech. I love languages, am fluent in English (my native tongue) and Spanish, and have some French and German, and a smattering of a few other languages. I also like the chellenge of Czech, especially the grammar. I'm finding it harder to learn now that I'm older (almost 50), and liken my Czech ability to that of a baby. I hope to improve that. I'm using the basic Pimsleur CDs, and have just ordered the computer package someone suggested earlier, as well as having my friends correct me when I make mistakes (possibly one of the best ways to learn).
     
  7. miti38

    miti38 New Member

    Hi
    I'm a beginner learning Czech. We had an exchange student from the Czech Republic live with us for a year, several years ago. He has come back and forth for several visits, this year his mom and his girlfriend came for 2 weeks at Christmas. They taught us some Czech while they were here and we've been corresponding via email, I'm trying to write some Czech, they some English. I just got the Pimsleur CD set and have started to use it. I love languages and I and enjoying learning some Czech. It is hard! Michele
     
  8. Doctor When

    Doctor When New Member

    I'm a keen and seasoned traveller, and whilst not skilled in any particular language, I like to make some sort of effort when travelling abroad. So many of my British compatriots simply don't bother.. and I do prefer to distance myself from the more embarrasing aspects of British tourism when I travel abroad.

    I picked up a few choice phrases when I first visited the region about ten years ago - I drove across Europe and visited the Czech Republic, and on to Slovakia. Having previously been (as a child) to Romania, Bulgaria and the former Yugoslavia I have many happy memories of Central & Eastern Europe. I feel quite at home in all of the C&E EU countries I've visited. If I believed in that sort of thing, I'd say I had lived a previous life there!

    I've been told I'm incredibly good at accents... I have a smattering of useful phrases in stock for a number of, erm, "obscure" languages - and when I meet anyone from Romania or CzR (although I work in the IT industry, I have a 'weekend job' involving meeting lots of tourists), I love to see their face when I manage to get one in!

    Once or twice I've managed to convince someone I'm fluent, thanks to my pronunciation, and they have engaged me in conversation - despite my usual stock phrase of "I'm sorry, I don't speak Czech/Romanian/Bulgarian!"

    I'm going to be in Prague for the weekend of April 1st and I look forward to brushing the dust off my best phrases!
     
  9. dzurisova

    dzurisova Well-Known Member

    I'm learning Czech because my husband is from the Czech Republic. His mother doesn't speak English. I told him I'm learning his language so I can call his mother and complain about him when he drives me nuts. She knows how to get him in line! :wink:
     
  10. Ariana

    Ariana Member

    Hmm, everyone seems to have a good reason and a connection with Czech. I'm learning Czech for fun. I love languages, and I've found Czech very interesting. Not to mention keeping my options open to move out of America later on.
     
  11. rubberduckyspy

    rubberduckyspy New Member

    I'm learning Czech because I am doing a high school exchange program to the Czech Republic (just outside of Opava) next school year.
     
  12. GoodSirJava

    GoodSirJava Member

    I want to learn Czech because it's painful and intimidating. Also, Czechia seems to have lots of white womens.

    No they aren't. The few who are just happen to congregate here. =)
     
  13. mravenec

    mravenec Well-Known Member

    Mr Java,

    what are you on about??...
     
  14. GoodSirJava

    GoodSirJava Member

    I distinctly remember typing HOT white womens.

    CENSORSHIP :eek: :eek: :eek:
     
  15. CatherineAnne

    CatherineAnne New Member

    Hi, I will be visiting Prague for the first time this August and my motto is: while in a country, speak the language of that country. I have just returned from China and managed with Chinese, so Czech is the next one on my list. I also have a more sentimental reason for wanting to learn Czech. I starting taking violin lessons at the age of 3 and my teacher is from the Czech republic. While he did not return often, he carried a love for his country that made us all love it and dream of it. We played traditional czech songs at our x-mas recitals and when his nieces babysat us, they told us tales from their country and thaught us some songs and some of the language. Listening to Bedrich Smetana, I always dreamt of visiting the Czech republic. This August, it will finally be a reality and I am really looking forward to it (my mom is jaleous!)

    Catherine
     
  16. Shaka

    Shaka Active Member

    my family jealous whenever i leave england, even for a holiday, i dont understand how people are busting to come to the UK, while the brits minds' are set on getting out!
     
  17. LaRusski

    LaRusski Active Member

    I got interested in Czech because I might be going to the Czech Republic this summer, and it would obviously be useful to know some of the language. My dad has some friends who were born in Czechoslovakia and who can speak Czech and I thought it might be cool to be able to have a Czech conversation with them. Also I like foreign languages, particularly Slavic ones, and I thought Czech would be fun to learn. It's kind of similar to Russian, so that makes it easy to pick up on since I already know some Russian.
     
  18. naem

    naem New Member

    Kolik umíš jazyků, tolikrát jsi člověkem :D, když už
    Styď se : o)
     
  19. Ladis

    Ladis Well-Known Member

    OMG, you quoted a half year old post :lol:. I know also the version "Kolik jazyků znáš, tolikrát jsi člověkem". Maybe there's no the only one correct form.

    EDIT: Plz fill your location in your profile.
     
  20. TroskuAmericanka

    TroskuAmericanka Active Member

    Hi, I have a kind of long story but I will keep it as short as possible. I'm 21 years old, and have absolutely no Czech heritage whatsoever (unfortunately!!). I first came to Czech in 2000 for an English camp and have been obsessed with the place ever since. I started learning Czech by myself after that, and have still been going. No teacher though. I have now been to 6 different English camps and now live in Czech. It sure helps the language learning to actually live in the country!! I'll be going home in 2 weeks back to Minnesota but I think about Czech every day that I'm away and I will miss my friends a lot. I'm glad to be learning Czech!! I think I have made it to an advanced level. Having friends that don't speak English definitely helps too! :D
     

Share This Page