inquiring about employment

For expatriates living in the Czech Republic or those considering moving there.

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IMJOHNII
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Joined: 29-Apr-05 11:15
Location: FLORIDA

inquiring about employment

Postby IMJOHNII » 29-Nov-05 19:35

I am currantly a Law Enforcement Officer in Florida and thinking about moving to Czech Republic. I am unsure of available employment that could use my training. I have also managed auto part stores and increased sales by 30 to 40 percent. If anyone has any infromation please write back. My Czech language is poor but currantly have a tutor teaching me.
KJP
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Postby KJP » 30-Nov-05 9:49

You would never be able to work in law enforcement here, you must be a native...things like that, firemen, police, etc are exclusivley for czechs, and the same holds true for most countries. I too am American, but w/o a strong command of the langauge and an advanced degree, I would not recommend it. Moreover, you're probably use to about 3-4 K a month, here you would be luckly to make 1500 a month, and the costs of most goods has skyrocketed. I recently saw a bathroom cabinet that I put in a rental in the states, purchased at Home D for 165 USD. The same one(yes identical) is selling here in BauHaus for 27,000 Kc (about 1300USD).

Wish I had better news, but I dont recommend it any longer for my friends either. Back in 92 there were opportunities to be had, now it is as expensive as NY without the wages to support it.
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GlennInFlorida
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Postby GlennInFlorida » 30-Nov-05 13:12

True, wages are not comparable and many jobs are "reserved" for native Czechs (as they should be, in my opinion) but the price of goods and services are not all completely out of hand. Some examples: public transport - we have nothing here in Tampa (at any price) that compares to the combined tram (streetcar), metro (subway), and bus system in Praha. It is very efficient, clean and reasonably priced (long term tickets are a particular bargain). Basic items can be found at a good price, too. On my last trip to Praha, I did a lot of "window shopping" just to get a feel for the cost of day to day living. While some things were outrageous (a pair of 20USD Wrangler jeans on sale for 85USD), others were reasonable (local jeans for about 20USD). Maybe it's just the fancy "imported" stuff that is overly expensive. Found a nice sweater in Tesco (not the cheapest place in town) on sale for 12USD (yes, they had 40 to 60USD sweaters too but, the one on sale suited me fine) and a good pair of reading glasses in Carrefores for 6USD (12 to 20USD back here). Because I was staying in an apartment, I had to do some basic food and toiletry shopping. I found most basic items to be less than I was used to paying in the States and certainly of equal or better quality.
At any rate, a move to the Czech Republic is a big decision and should not be taken lightly. I agree that a strong command of Czech would be essential for any non tourist related work (possibly even for tourist related work) and employment, housing, taxes, health coverage, and the like should be fully investigated, understood, and confirmed prior to making a move.
KJP
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Postby KJP » 30-Nov-05 14:38

Well said Glenn, and I agree that public transport, even after this years increase, is still a bargan at about 20USD per month. In case you haven't heard it in my writings, I am planning my departure from here shortly. I have had the dubious distinction of having seen the country grow, having first arrived in 1992. I came and went for 10 years, staying as long as 9 months one time, and then eventually moved here permenently in 2001. Now, I no longer find it plausible. Additionally, this fellow might be interested in the fact that very few Americans live in Prague for reasons already stated. Many Brits live here, for they have very cheap flights or they can drive.
magan
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Postby magan » 01-Dec-05 14:10

Yes, things have changed here a lot. I have been coming back and forth for many years (before revolution too). When I came right after revolution and worked here as volunteer for two years, we could afford to work for free. We paid $100/month for 3 room furnished apartment and that was about 3 times what owners paid at that time - of course we paid happily. It was great bargain to live here THEN. Travel was just fantastic, even through local travel agency (cedok) is was very reasonable to travel anywhere

It seems that ever since stories travel around about how "cheep" it is here and it is very deceiving as those who were telling those stories were the fast ones who came here right after revolution in early 1990. Now, 15 years later, stories about how inexpensive things are here are still going around as those who came then have just wonderful memories.

Things changed drastically. People live differently, foreign companies moved in and sell their goods for "western prices"+++
I too had to furnish apartment and was pulling my hair over the new furnishing I have seen in the stores and prices viz your bathroom cabinet. Yes, some things are ridiculously expensive, regardless of low quality.

I also spend same amount of money for household (food toiletries) as I do in Canada. You can find rental prices on internet.

Transportation is still great - with pass it really gives you freedom and because tram has right of way, if you live nearby (metro too of course) it works much faster than car. Longer pass you buy - cheeper it is - you can buy 1 yr worth.

Of course, there are still some differences where you do find lower prices such as travel out of town, some groceries which locals use everyday... I would think that by the time EU currency comes here all prices will be up there with rest of the Europe.

I would not think that CR is ideal place for American youth to come and live in financial freedom, I am pretty sure that they would be up for dissapointment. More so, because Czechs are for long time sick and tired with people coming "to teach English" with only qualification that they were born in English speaking country. These jobs are long time gone and for anything more substantial (at least at par with locals) you need to have perfect command in Czech language.

It could be interesting to hear from someone who is still able to live carefree lifestyle without parents supplementing it. Or someone who made successful carrier here in last few years.
capponilos
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Postby capponilos » 26-May-06 7:20

Oh... it sounds like a dream to get rich in CR :-). Only teaching my born language (spanish) is how I could make some money here. LUCKLY for the Czech-born people, the government keeps the jobs for them... lucky them, and... I love it that way, money is not my cup of tea, how they say :-)
www.danielachrastil.com / Learn Spanish in the CR

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