My Czech Republic Home
Search My Czech Republic

 Community Message Boards Member Login
 Guidelines   Check your private messagesCheck your private messages  Profile  Search Forums  FAQ  Help  Chat Register for free!

K.J. Erben - Svatební košile

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Multimedia
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Swordslayer
Senior Member


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 150
Location: South Bohemia

PostPosted: 28-Apr-09 21:51  Reply with quote

 
A poem written by Karel Jaromír Erben (1811-1870), a part of the collection of twelve poems, Kytice. Supposedly translated by Flora Pauline Wilson Kopta around 1896, no longer protected by copyright. Original Czech text to be found below this post.

Video – Part I – J. Kábrt (1978)
Video – Part II – J. Kábrt (1978)

NOTE: the video doesn't (by far) narrate all the lines of the poem; still, I think it is a good complement to the text

THE WEDDING SHIRT

The eleventh hour was past and gone,
But still the lamp burnt on and on.

The lamp that on the praying chair
Cast an uneven, ghastly glare.

On the low wall a picture hung,
God's parents, praised by every tongue.

The parents with the Holy Child,
Hoses, with rosebud, saintly mild.

Before the heavenly three a maid
Upon her knees her prayers said.

Her face shone with a holy rest,
Her arms were crossed upon her breast.

And as her tears fell soft and slow,
Her bosom swelled with hidden woe.

Her tears they fell like diamonds bright
Upon her bosom snowy white.

"Alas, my God! my father lies
Beneath the grass, dust in his eyes."

"Alas, my God! my mother sleeps
Beside him — there where no one weeps."

"My sister died within a year;
In battle fell my brother dear."

"But though so lonely, still I loved
Above myself a youth beloved."

"He wandered far to earn his bread —
And came no more — perhaps is dead."

"Before he went away he said,
Wiping my tears, 'We soon shall wed.'"

"'Sow flax, my loved one, in your field;
God give you have a bounteous yield."

"'The first year spin the fiaxen thread.
Then bleach it white, we soon shall wed;
The third year, sew thy shirt,' he said."

"'And when the shirt is sewed, my fair,
Then make a garland for thy hair.'"

"The shirt I finished, put away,
And there it lies unto this day."

"My wreath is faded, withered now —
But where art thou? Oh, where art thou?"

"In the wide world you went away.
Wide as the sea, I heard them say."

"Three years have passed — I do not know
If still you live — perhaps lie low."

"Mary! Virgin of mighty strength!
Give me, give me thy aid at length."

"Bring, oh, bring, my loved again —
Make an end of my lingering pain."

"Bring my loved to me again,
Or let me die — my life is vain."

"I hoped indeed to be his wife —
And without him — well, what is life!"

"Mary! Mother of Mercy, hear,
And grant my prayer even here."

The pictured face bowed low her head —
The maiden shrieked, and would have fled.

The lamp that had been burning dim
Went out. Was it the north — wind's whim?

"Was it the wind — or can it be
Some evil token unto me?"

"Hush! Did I hear a timid tap
Upon the window, rap, rap, rap.

"Art thou asleep, or dost thou wake?
Up, my beloved! Up, for my sake."

"Up, my beloved, and look at me —
If you still know me, I would see.
And is thy hand and heart still free?"

"Oh I my beloved, and can it be!
See I was thinking just of thee."

"Praying indeed that we might meet,
That God might lead thy wandering feet."

"Leave thy praying, and come with me —
Bah on thy praying — come with me!"

"The moon is shining far and wide.
Come quick with me, come quick, my bride."

"For God's sake! Why, my love, 'tis night —
'Tis late — wait only for the light."

"The wind howls, and the night is dark.
Wait till the dawn, and then we start."

"Bah! Day is night and night is day —
I dream in the daytime — come away."

"Before the cock crows, thou must be
My wife, so come along with me."

"Don't talk, but come along with me.
Ere the day dawn, my wife thou'lt be."

It was deep midnight when they went,
The moon far off watched, nearly spent.

The landscape lay in silence deep,
Only the wind it would not sleep.

And he went onward, striding fast,
She, step for step, behind him passed.

The dogs came out and howled in choir,
When'er they passed a cottage door.

And see, they saw a strange, strange sight,
A corpse that walked about at night.

"The night is fine — such nights the dead
Rise from their graves, I've heard it said."

"And ere one knows, stand by one's side —
My love doth fear? Wouldst thou hide?"

"Why should I fear? Why should I hide?
God is above — thou by my side."

"But tell me, is your father well?
And will he like with me to dwell?"

"And is your mother satisfied.
To have me always by her side?"

"Why, my beloved one, do you ask?
Keep your health only for this task."

"To reach our home — come quick, come quick —
The way is long — thou art not quick."

"What hast thou in thy hand, my bride?"
"My mass book, that no ill betide."

"Throw it away, 'tis like a stone —
I hate to hear thy praying tone."

"Throw it away, thou'll lighter be.
Throw it away, and come with me."

He took the book, and tossed away —
They gained ten miles upon the way.

And the path was rocky and lone,
Amidst forests that made a moan.

And behind the mountains and rocks
Howled the wild dogs, in savage flocks.

And the voice of the screech-owl told
Of evil that threatened the bold.

And he went onward, striding fast,
She, step for step, behind him passed.

Across the stony, rocky way,
Her white feet went that evil day.

And e'en the weeds, and tangled grass,
Were stained with blood as she did pass.

"The night is fine — such nights the dead
Walk with the living, I've heard said."

"And ere one knows, stand by one's side —
My love doth fear? Wouldst thou hide?"

"Why should I fear? Why should I hide?
God is above — thou by my side."

"But, tell me, is your cottage large?
And who, my love, has it in charge?"

"Is the room big? And is it bright?
Is the church, loved one, within sight?"

"Much, my fair one, you question me;
Come on, quick, then you soon will see."

"Quicken thy pace, the way is long,
Time flies, yes, quicker, then a song."

"What hangs about thy waist, I pray?"
"My rosary I took on the way."

"Thy rosary! It winds like a snake —
It makes me anxious for thy sake."

"Throw it away, it stops thy speed.
And follow quickly where I lead."

The rosary he threw away —
Twenty miles they were on their way.

And the road was swampy and bad.
By morasses, desolate, sad.

O'er the marshes the corpse-lights shone,
Ghastly blue they glimmered alone.

Nine on each side, they went ahead,
As though they burned for some poor dead.

The frogs they sang the burial hymn,
The blue lights flickered and grew dim.

And he went onward, striding fast,
She wearily behind him passed.

Poor maiden, why your feet are sore,
And blood runs where your feet you tore.

The weeds are covered with your blood,
But on he strides with heavy thud.

"The night is fine — such nights the dead
Seek out the living, I've heard said."

"And ere one thinks, one's grave is near —
Say, my beloved, dost thou fear?"

"I fear not; thou art by my side —
And God's will — why it must betide."

"But wait a moment, let me stay,
And rest a while upon the way."

Her soul was faint, her knees were weak.
And swords seemed in her heart to meet.

"Come quick, come quick, oh maiden mine.
Our home is near, make no repine."

"The banquet's spread — the guests they wait —
Time flies, we surely will be late."

"What hast thou on that ribbon fine
Upon thy throat, oh loved one mine?"
"My mother's cross — the cross divine."

"Ha, ha, that golden cross it pricks —
I see the blood it slowly tricks."

"It wounds you — cast it from you now,
Then you'll speed on, you know not how."

The cross he took, and cast away —
Thirty miles they gained on their way.

Upon a wide and open plain
She saw a building once again.

The windows they were narrow, high,
A bell hung in the turret nigh.

"Look, my beloved one, we are near.
How does it please thee, let me hear"

"Ah God! It is a church I see"
"Tis no church, but belongs to me!"

"That churchyard, and those crosses thine?"
"No crosses — trees for which I pine!"

"Look on me, loved one, over all,
Then quickly jump over the wall."

"Oh, let me be, thy look is wild —
Thou art no longer gentle, mild."

"Thy breath is like a poison rare.
Thy heart it is no longer there."

"Oh, fear me not! A happy life
Is thine if thou wilt be my wife.

"Meat thou'lt have — without blood I say.
Except by hazard — just to-day."

"What hast thou in thy bundle there?"
"The shirts I made of linen fair."

"Two are enough — throw them away.
One for us each, enough I say."

He threw the bundle on the wall.
It fell upon a gravestone tall.

"Be not afraid, but look at me.
And jump across the wall you see."

"You went before me all the way.
Then lead across the wall, I pray."

"I followed but the path you trod.
Jump over first upon the sod."

He jumped across the churchyard wall.
He thought of treason not at all.

Five feet he leaped into the air.
Then he looked back, no maid was there.

But like a flash he saw a form
Glide by him, in the dark, forlorn.

There stood indeed a chamber small.
One heard the latchstring quickly fall.

A narrow room, with windows none —
Through chinks the moonlight passage won.

And in that cage-like room on bier,
A corpse is laid with no one near.

Ah, what is this — this nameless fear —
The ghouls are stirring — they are here!

One hears them — they are gliding on —
And strange and weird their ghostly song.

"The body to the earth is told,
Alas! for him who lost his soul."

And on the door one heard them rap.
And awful was their tap, tap, tap.

"Arise, oh dead one, from thy bier,
Pull back the latch, we all are here."

The dead one opens wide his eyes,
He makes as though he would arise.

His head he raises from the bier,
He looks about him, far and near.

"Great God! Thy mercy now I pray —
Oh, keep me from the devil's sway!"

"You dead one, lay you down to sleep —
God in His mercy, thy soul keep."

The corpse lay down again in peace,
Of sleep he took anoUier lease.

But listen! Once again the rap,
And stronger now their tap, tap, tap.

"Arise, oh dead one, from thy bier.
Open the room — the dead are here."

And at that knock, and at that song,
The dead woke from his slumbers strong.

He stretched his stiff arm to the door,
And would perhaps have gained the floor.

"Christ save thy soul! And mercy give —
He can and will, thy sins forgive!"

"You dead one, lay you down to sleep,
God give you joy, and slumber deep."

The corpse he stretched him out again,
And stiffly lay as he had lain.

And once again that awful rap —
Her head reeled as she heard that tap.

"Arise, oh dead one, from thy bier,
Give us the living — do you hear?"

Alas! alas! poor maiden mine,
The dead are here, for the third time.

The dead stares from his sunken eyes,
He looks to where the maiden lies.

"Mary! Mother of God, be near!
Pray to thy son, I fear, I fear!"

"The prayer I prayed it was not right.
Forgive me! Save me in thy might."

" Mary! Mother of mercy hear!
Save me, oh save me, even here."

And see — just at that moment dread,
The cock crows, and the dead falls dead.

And all around the cocks crow clear,
The night is past, the dawn is near.

The dead one lies upon the floor,
Just as he went to open the door.

Without the silence is profound,
Unbroken by a single sound.

The sun rose high, the people came,
To hear the mass and praise God's name.

A new and open grave they found —
The girl was in the dead-house round.

A wedding favor on each mound,
Made from her shirts, they quickly found.

Thev filled the grave, and burnt with care,
Eacn rag that they found anywhere.

The maiden from a foreign part,
They kindly took unto their heart.

"Well for you, maiden, that you prayed,
Of evil that you were afraid;
And even in God's ways have strayed."

"Or, like your shirts, you would have been
Torn into bits, by ghouls, I ween."

"Well for you that you knelt to pray,
Or lost your soul had been this day."

 
 
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Swordslayer
Senior Member


Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 150
Location: South Bohemia

PostPosted: 28-Apr-09 21:52  Reply with quote

 
SVATEBNÍ KOŠILE

Již jedenáctá odbila,
a lampa ještě svítila,
a lampa ještě hořela,
co nad klekadlem visela.

Na stěně nízké světničky
byl obraz boží rodičky,
rodičky boží s děťátkem
tak jako růže s poupátkem

A před tou mocnou světicí
viděti pannu klečící:
klečela, líce skloněné,
ruce na prsa složené;
slzy jí z očí padaly,
želem se ňádra zdvihaly.
A když slzička upadla,
v ty bílé ňádra zapadla.

"Žel bohu, kde můj tatíček?
Již na něm roste trávníček!
žel bohu, kde má matička?
Tam leží — podle tatíčka!
Sestra do roka nežila,
bratra mi koule zabila.

Měla jsem, smutná, milého,
život bych dala pro něho!
Do ciziny se obrátil,
potud se ještě nevrátil.

Do ciziny se ubíral,
těšil mě, slzy utíral:
"Zasej, má milá, zasej len,
vzpomínej na mě každý den,
první rok přádla hledívej,
druhý rok plátno polívej,
třetí košile vyšívej:
až ty košile ušiješ,
věneček z routy poviješ."

Již jsem košile ušila,
již jsem je v truhle složila,
již moje routa v odkvětě:
a milý ještě ve světě,
ve světě širém širokém,
co kámen v moři hlubokém.
Tři léta o něm ani sluch,
živ-li a zdráv — zná milý bůh!

Maria, panno přemocná,
ach, budiž ty mi pomocna:
vrať mi milého z ciziny,
květ blaha mého jediný;
milého z ciziny mi vrať —
aneb život můj náhle zkrať:
u něho život jarý květ —
bez něho však mě mrzí svět.
Maria, matko milosti,
buď pomocnicí v žalosti!"

Pohnul se obraz na stěně —
i vzkřikla panna zděšeně;
lampa, co temně hořela,
prskla a zhasla docela.
Možná, žeť větru tažení,
možná i — zlé že znamení!

A slyš! na záspí kroků zvuk,
a na okénko: ťuk, ťuk, ťuk!
"Spíš má panenko, nebo bdíš?
Hoj, má panenko, tu jsem již!
Hoj, má panenko, co děláš?
a zdalipak mě ještě znáš,
aneb jiného v srdci máš?"

"Ach můj milý! Ach pro nebe!
Tu dobu myslím na tebe;
na tě jsem vždycky myslila,
za tě se právě modlila!"

"Ho, nech modlení — skoč a pojď,
skoč a pojď a mě doprovoď;
měsíček svítí na cestu"
já přišel pro svou nevěstu."

"Ach proboha! Ach co pravíš?
Kamž bychom šli — tak pozdě již!
Vítr burácí, pustá noc,
počkej jen do dne — není moc."

"Ho, den je noc, a noc je den —
ve dne mé oči tlačí sen!
Dřív než se vzbudí kohouti,
musím tě za svou pojmouti.
Jen neprodlévej, skoč a pojď,
dnes ještě budeš moje choť!"

Byla noc, byla hluboká,
měsíček svítil z vysoka,
a ticho, pusto v dědině,
vítr burácel jedině.

A on tu napřed — skok a skok,
a ona za ním, co jí krok.
Psi houfem ve vsi zavyli,
když ty pocestné zvětřili;
a vyli, vyli divnou věc:
žetě nablízku umrlec!

"Pěkná noc, jasná — v tu dobu
vstávají mrtví ze hrobů,
a nežli zvíš, jsou tobě blíž —
má milá, nic se nebojíš?"

"Což bych se bála? Tys se mno
a oko boží nade mnou. —
Pověz, můj milý, řekni přec,
živ-li a zdráv je tvůj otec?
Tvůj otec a tvá milá máť,
a ráda-li mě bude znáť?"

"Moc, má panenko, moc se ptáš!
Jen honem pojď — však uhlídáš.
Jen honem pojď — čas nečeká
a cesta naše daleká. —
Co máš, má milá, v pravici?"

"Nesu si knížky modlicí."

"Zahoď je pryč! To modlení
je těžší nežli kamení!
Zahoď je pryč! Ať lehce jdeš,
jestli mi postačiti chceš."

Knížky jí vzal a zahodil,
a byli skokem deset mil. —

A byla cesta výšinou,
skalami, lesní pustinou;
a v rokytí a v úskalí
divoké feny štěkaly;
a kulich hlásal pověsti:
žetě nablízku neštěstí. —

A on vždy napřed — skok a skok,
a ona za ním, co jí krok.
Po šípkoví a po skalí
ty bílé nohy šlapaly;
a na hloží a křemení
zůstalo krve znamení.

"Pěkná noc — jasná — v tento čas
mrtví s živými chodí zas;
a nežli zvíš, jsou tobě blíž —
má milá, nic se nebojíš?"

"Což bych se bála? Tys se mnou
a ruka Páně nade mnou. —
Pověz, můj milý, řekni jen,
jak je tvůj domek upraven?
Čistá světnička? Veselá?
A zdali blízko kostela?"

"Moc, má panenko, moc se ptáš!
Však ještě dnes to uhlídáš.
Jen honem pojď — čas utíká
a dálka ještě veliká. —
Co máš má milá za pasem?"

"Růženec s sebou vzala jsem."

"Ho, ten růženec z klokočí
jako had tebe otočí.
Zúží tě, stáhne tobě dech:
zahoď jej pryč — neb máme spěch!"

Růženec popad, zahodil,
a byli skokem dvacet mil. —

A byla cesta nížinou,
přes vody, luka, bažinou;
a po bažině, po sluji
modrá světélka laškují:
dvě řady, devět za sebou,
jako když s tělem k hrobu jdou;
a žabí havěť v potoce
pohřební píseň skřehoce. —

A on vždy napřed — skok a skok,
a jí za ním již slábne krok.
Ostřice dívku ubohou
břitvami řeže do nohou;
a to kapradí zelené
je krví její zbarvené.

"Pěkná noc, jasná — v tu dobu
spěchají živí ke hrobu;
a nežli zvíš, jsi hrobu blíž —
má milá, nic se nebojíš?"

"Ach nebojím, vždyť tys se mnou
a vůle Páně nade mnou!
Jen ustaň málo v pospěchu,
jen popřej málo oddechu.
Duch slábne, nohy klesají
a k srdci nože bodají!"

"Jen pojď a pospěš, děvče mé,
však brzo již tam budeme.
Hosté čekají, čeká kvas
a jako střela letí čas. —
Co to máš na té tkaničce,
na krku na té tkaničce?"

"To křížek po mé matičce."

"Hoho, to zlato proklaté
má hrany ostře špičaté!
Bodá tě — a mě nejinak,
zahoď to, budeš jako pták!"

Křížek utrh a zahodil,
a byli skokem třicet mil. —

Tu na planině široké
stavení stojí vysoké;
úzká a dlouhá okna jsou
a věž se zvonkem nad střechou.

"Hoj, má panenko, tu jsme již!
Nic, má panenko, nevidíš?"

"Ach proboha! Ten kostel snad?"

"To není kostel, to můj hrad!"

"Ten hřbitov — a těch křížů řad?"

"To nejsou kříže, to můj sad!
Hoj, má panenko, na mě hleď
a skoč vesele přes tu zeď!"

"Ó nech mne již! Ó nech mne tak!
Divý a hrozný je tvůj zrak;
tvůj dech otravný jako jed
a tvoje srdce tvrdý led!"

"Nic se má milá, nic neboj!
Veseloť u mne, všeho hoj:
masa dost — ale bez krve,
dnes bude jinak poprvé! —
Co máš v uzlíku, má milá?"

"Košile, co jsem ušila."

"Netřeba jich víc nežli dvě:
ta jedna tobě, druhá mně."

Uzlík jí vzal a s chechtotem
přehodil na hrob za plotem.
"Nic ty se neboj, na mě hleď
a skoč za uzlem přes tu zeď."

"Však jsi ty vždy byl přede mnou
a já za tebou cestou zlou;
však jsi byl napřed po ten čas:
skoč a ukaž mi cestu zas!"

Skokem přeskočil ohradu,
nic nepomyslil na zradu;
skočil do výšky sáhů pět —
jí však již venku nevidět:
jenom po bílém obleku
zablesklo se jest v útěku
a schrána její blízko dost —
nenadál se zlý její host!

Stojíť tu, stojí komora:
nizoučké dvéře — závora;
zavrzly dvéře za pannou
a závora jí ochranou.
Stavení skrovné, bez oken,
měsíc lištami šeřil jen;
stavení pevné jako klec
a v něm na prkně — umrlec.

Hoj, jak se venku vzmáhá hluk,
hrobových oblud mocný pluk;
šumí a kolem klapají
a takto píseň skuhrají:

"Tělo do hrobu přísluší,
běda, kdos nedbal o duši!"

A tu na dvéře: buch, buch, buch!
burácí zvenčí její druh:
"Vstávej, umrlče, nahoru,
odstrč mi tam tu závoru!"

A mrtvý oči otvírá,
a mrtvý oči protírá,
sbírá se, hlavu pozvedá
a půlkruhem se ohlédá.

"Bože svatý, rač pomoci,
nedejž mne ďáblu do moci! —
Ty mrtvý, lež a nevstávej,
pán bůh ti pokoj věčný dej!"

A mrtvý hlavu položiv,
zamhouřil oči jako dřív. —

A tu poznovu — buch, buch, buch!
silněji tluče její druh:
"Vstávej, umrlče, nahoru,
otevři mi svou komoru!"

A na ten hřmot a na ten hlas
mrtvý se zdvihá z prkna zas
a rámě ztuhlé naměří
tam, kde závora u dveří.

"Spas duši, Kriste Ježíši,
smiluj se v bídě nejvyšší! —
Ty mrtvý, nevstávej a lež;
pán bůh tě potěš — a mne též!"

A mrtvý zas se položiv,
natáhnul údy jako dřív. —

A znovu venku: buch, buch, buch!
až panně mizí zrak i sluch!
"Vstávej, umrlče, hola, hou,
a podej mi sem tu živou!"

Ach běda, běda děvčeti!
Umrlý vstává potřetí
a velké, kalné své oči
na polumrtvou otočí.

"Maria Panno, při mně stůj,
u syna svého oroduj!
Nehodně jsem tě prosila:
ach odpusť, co jsem zhřešila!
Maria, matko milosti,
z té moci zlé mě vyprosti!"

A slyš, tu právě nablízce
kokrhá kohout ve vísce;
a za ním, co ta dědina,
všecka kohoutí družina.

Tu mrtvý, jak se postavil,
pádem se na zem povalil,
a venku ticho — ani ruch:
zmizel dav i zlý její druh. —

Ráno když lidé na mši jdou,
v úžasu státi zůstanou:
hrob jeden dutý nahoře,
panna v umrlčí komoře
a na každičké mohyle
útržek z nové košile. —

Dobře ses, panno, radila,
na boha že jsi myslila
a druha zlého odbyla!
Bys byla jinak jednala,
zle bysi byla skonala:
tvé tělo bílé, spanilé
bylo by co ty košile!

 
 
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
scrimshaw
Senior Member


Joined: 31 Dec 2004
Posts: 3166
Location: Florida

PostPosted: 04-May-09 23:01  Reply with quote

Some of that was spoken words in the drama, some just narration.
These are the exact words spoken in that 1978 drama, with narration at beginning and end.

SVATEBNÍ KOŠILE

Již jedenáctá odbila,
a lampa ještě svítila,
a lampa ještě hořela,
co nad klekadlem visela.

Měla jsem, smutná, milého,
život bych dala pro něho!
Do ciziny se obrátil,
potud se ještě nevrátil.

Do ciziny se ubíral,
těšil mě, slzy utíral:

"Zasej, má milá, zasej len,
vzpomínej na mě každý den,
první rok přádla hledívej,
druhý rok plátno polívej,
třetí košile vyšívej:
až ty košile ušiješ,
věneček z routy poviješ."

Již jsem košile ušila,
již jsem je v truhle složila,
a milý ještě ve světě,
ve světě širém širokém
Tři léta o něm ani sluch,
živ-li a zdráv — zná milý bůh!

vrať mi milého z ciziny,
květ blaha mého jediný;
milého z ciziny mi vrať —
aneb život můj náhle zkrať:

"Ach můj milý! Ach pro nebe!
Tu dobu myslím na tebe;
na tě jsem vždycky myslila,
za tě se právě modlila!"

"Ho, nech modlení — skoč a pojď,
skoč a pojď a mě doprovoď;
měsíček svítí na cestu"
já přišel pro svou nevěstu."

Dřív než se vzbudí kohouti,
musím tě za svou pojmouti.
Jen neprodlévej, skoč a pojď,
dnes ještě budeš moje choť!"

Co to máš na té tkaničce,
na krku na té tkaničce?"

"To křížek po mé matičce."

"Hoho, to zlato proklaté
má hrany ostře špičaté!
Bodá tě — a mě nejinak,
zahoď to, budeš jako pták!"

2nd half

"Hoj, má panenko, tu jsme již!
Nic, má panenko, nevidíš?"

"Ach proboha! Ten kostel snad?"

"To není kostel, to můj hrad!"

"Ten hřbitov — a těch křížů řad?"

"To nejsou kříže, to můj sad!
Hoj, má panenko, na mě hleď
a skoč vesele přes tu zeď!"

"Ó nech mne již! Ó nech mne tak!
Divý a hrozný je tvůj zrak;
tvůj dech otravný jako jed
a tvoje srdce tvrdý led!"

"Nic se má milá, nic neboj!
Veseloť u mne, všeho hoj:

Co máš v uzlíku, má milá?"

"Košile, co jsem ušila."

"Netřeba jich víc nežli dvě:
ta jedna tobě, druhá mně."

"Nic ty se neboj, na mě hleď
a skoč za uzlem přes tu zeď."

"Však jsi ty vždy byl přede mnou
a já za tebou cestou zlou;
však jsi byl napřed po ten čas:
skoč a ukaž mi cestu zas!"

(buch, buch, buch)
"Vstávej, umrlče, nahoru,
odstrč mi tam tu závoru!"

''Ty mrtvý, lež a nevstávej;
pán bůh ti pokoj věčný dej!''

"Vstávej, umrlče, nahoru,
otevři mi svou komoru!"

Ty mrtvý, nevstávej a lež;
pán bůh tě potěš — a mne též!"

"Vstávej, umrlče, hola, hou,
a podej mi sem tu živou!"

Ráno když lidé na mši jdou,
v úžasu státi zůstanou:
hrob jeden dutý nahoře,
panna v umrlčí komoře
a na každičké mohyle
útržek z nové košile. —
_________________
Jsem zvědav, jak by to vypadalo, kdybych byl přivolávačem deště. Jak by to vypadalo, kdybych uměl přivolat déšt'?
Mám pocit ale, že se to bohužel nikdy nedozvím.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
meluzina
Senior Member


Joined: 09 Mar 2004
Posts: 279

PostPosted: 05-May-09 6:31  Reply with quote

have you seen the film version of Kytice?

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0239102/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Multimedia All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
    RSS Help

Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy

Copyright © 1998-2016 Local Lingo s.r.o.