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dzurisova
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Joined: 13 Apr 2006
Posts: 1710
Location: Michigan, USA

PostPosted: 11-Apr-11 20:24  Reply with quote

So I have a few names I'm hoping you all can help me learn the "sweet" way to say them. Ex Bara > Baruška, Ava > Evička

Men
Martin
Zdenek
Honza
Adam
Aleš
Mito
Libor
Jano
Jaro
Milan

Women
Liba
Jana
Vlasta


Also, if you don't mind, after you write the "sweet" way, then please write it in the vocative form. ex: Ava > Evička > Evičko

Thanks for you help Smile
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Jana
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Joined: 07 Dec 1999
Posts: 1066
Location: VA, U.S.A., Olomouc, ČR

PostPosted: 11-Apr-11 21:59  Reply with quote

Men
Martin: Martínek - Martínku; Marťa - Marťo
Zdenek: Zdeněček - Zdeněčku, Zdeňa - Zdeni
Honza (Jan): Honzík - Honzíku; Honzíček - Honzíčku; Jenda - Jendo; Jeník - Jeníku; Jeníček - Jeníčku; Janíček - Janíčku; Janeček - Janečku; Janík - Janíku; Janeček - Janečku
Adam: Adámek - Adámku
Aleš: Alešek - Alešku
Mito - I do not know such a Czech name
Libor: Liborek - Liborku
Jano - Slovak form of Jan
Jaro - Slovak diminutive form of Jaroslav or Jaromír
Milan: Milánek - Milánku

Women
Liba (Libuše): Libuška - Libuško; Libunka - Libunko; Bunka - Bunko
Jana: Janička - Janičko; Janinka - Janinko
Vlasta: Vlastička - Valstičko; Vlastinka - Vlastinko
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dzurisova
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Joined: 13 Apr 2006
Posts: 1710
Location: Michigan, USA

PostPosted: 12-Apr-11 1:41  Reply with quote

thanks, yeah, Mita is a nickname that came from a long story. As for Jano and Jaro, yeah, they are slovak. Wow, I didn't realize you guys were even seperated by names Smile
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Sova
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Joined: 05 Jan 2004
Posts: 1500
Location: NY, USA

PostPosted: 14-Apr-11 15:35  Reply with quote

Is Jaro strictly a Slovak diminutive? I have at least one Czech friend (from Jihlava) that went by Jaro (Jaroslav). Maybe it's an adopted form, but I'm not sure.
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Jana
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Joined: 07 Dec 1999
Posts: 1066
Location: VA, U.S.A., Olomouc, ČR

PostPosted: 14-Apr-11 15:59  Reply with quote

Quote:
Is Jaro strictly a Slovak diminutive? I have at least one Czech friend (from Jihlava) that went by Jaro (Jaroslav). Maybe it's an adopted form, but I'm not sure.

Are you sure it was Jaro (with short a)? Járo is vocative of a very common Czech diminutive Jára (Jaroslav or Jaromír). After all, Czech is such a rich language (namely spoken or common) that any nick name or diminutive can be used. One of my friends is called Miťka, but his birth certificate says he is Jaromír.
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wer
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Joined: 16 Nov 2005
Posts: 1700
Location: East Bohemia

PostPosted: 14-Apr-11 17:03  Reply with quote

Sova wrote:
Is Jaro strictly a Slovak diminutive?

Masculines with nominative ending -o are rare in Czech. For Czechs, the -o ending is archetypal of neutre.

Practically all words of Czech provenience ending in -o are neutres by origin. They are only exceptionally used in different genders when used as characteristics of person (e.g. lamželezo or various neutres turned into names). These words always preserves the flavour of being neutres.

Practically all loanwords ending in -o, with exception of names of persons, are without mercy neutralized. Foreign names ending in -o always sound distinctively foreign to Czech ears (Jaro, Miro, Paľo, Fero... -> Slovak; Dežo, Fero -> Gypsy; Ivo, Kvído, Hugo, Oto... -> just foreign). In fact, by using a name ending in -o you can effectivelly label a person as foreigner.
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Sova
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Joined: 05 Jan 2004
Posts: 1500
Location: NY, USA

PostPosted: 14-Apr-11 17:46  Reply with quote

Jana wrote:

Are you sure it was Jaro (with short a)? Járo is vocative of a very common Czech diminutive Jára (Jaroslav or Jaromír). After all, Czech is such a rich language (namely spoken or common) that any nick name or diminutive can be used. One of my friends is called Miťka, but his birth certificate says he is Jaromír.

Hmmm ... interesting. No, I'm not sure if it was a short a or long a. And now that you mention it, I'm not sure if the usage was strictly in the vocative or not. You're probably right, since I don't recall this friend having any Slovak family.
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